Articles in Canada ( 21,894 )

21,894 Articles of interest in Canada

Click on them to get its location and coordinates
  • Salish Sea human foot discoveries

    Since August 20, 2007, several detached human feet have been discovered on the coasts of the Salish Sea in British Columbia, Canada and Washington, United States. The feet belonged to five men, one woman, and three other people of unknown sex. Of th…

  • Montreal

    Montreal (/ˌmʌntrˈɒl/; French: Montréal, pronounced [ˈmõʁeal]) is a city in the Canadian province of Quebec. It is the largest city in the province, the second-largest in Canada and the 9th-largest in North America. Originally called Ville-Marie, …

  • Ontario

    Ontario /ɒnˈtɛəri/ is one of the ten provinces of Canada, located in east-central Canada. It is Canada's most populous province by a large margin, accounting for nearly 40 percent of all Canadians, and is the second largest province in total area.…

  • British Columbia

    British Columbia /ˌbrɪtɪʃ kəˈlʌmbiə/, also commonly referred to by its initials B.C., is a province located on the west coast of Canada. British Columbia is also a component of the Pacific Northwest, along with the U.S. states of Oregon and Washingt…

  • Oak Island

    Oak Island is a 57-hectare (140-acre) island in Lunenburg County on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada. The tree-covered island is one of about 360 small islands in Mahone Bay and rises to a maximum of 11 metres (36 feet) above sea level.

  • Ottawa

    Ottawa (/ˈɒtəwə/ or /ˈɒtəwɑː/) is the capital of Canada. It stands on the south bank of the Ottawa River in the eastern portion of Southern Ontario. Ottawa borders Gatineau, Quebec; the two form the cores of the Ottawa–Gatineau census metropolitan a…

  • Nova Scotia

    Nova Scotia (Latin for "New Scotland", pronounced in English as /ˌnvə ˈskʃə/) is one of Canada's three Maritime provinces and constitutes one of the four Atlantic Canada provinces. Located almost exactly halfway between the Equator and the North…

  • Alberta

    Alberta (/ælˈbɜrtə/) is a western province of Canada. With a population of 3,645,257 in 2011 and an estimated population of 4,145,992 as of October 1, 2014, it is Canada's fourth-most populous province and most populous of Canada's three prairie pro…

  • Nunavut

    Nunavut /ˈnnəˌvʊt/ (from Inuktitut: ᓄᓇᕗᑦ [ˈnunavut]) is the largest, northernmost, and newest territory of Canada.

  • Newfoundland and Labrador

    Newfoundland and Labrador (/nʲfənˈlænd ænd ˈlæbrədɔr/, French: Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador) is the most easterly province of Canada. Situated in the country's Atlantic region, it incorporates the island of Newfoundland and mainland Labrador to the nor…

  • CN Tower

    The CN Tower (French: Tour CN) is a 553.33 m-high (1,815.4 ft) concrete communications and observation tower in Downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Built on the former Railway Lands, it was completed in 1976, becoming the world's tallest free-standin…

  • Saskatchewan

    Saskatchewan (/səˈskæəwɨn/ or /səˈskæəˌwɑːn/) is a prairie province in Canada, which has a total area of 651,900 square kilometres (251,700 sq mi) and a land area of 592,534 square kilometres (228,800 sq mi), the remainder being water area (cove…

  • Yukon

    Yukon /ˈjuːkɒn/ (also commonly called the Yukon) is the westernmost and smallest of Canada's three federal territories.

  • Manitoba

    Manitoba /ˌmænɨˈtbə/ is a Canadian prairie province. The province, with an area of 649,950 square kilometres (250,900 sq mi), has a largely continental climate, with thousands of lakes and many rivers.

  • Prince Edward Island

    Prince Edward Island (PEI or P.E.I.; French: Île-du-Prince-Édouard, pronounced: [il dy pʁɛ̃s‿edwaʁ], Quebec French pronunciation: [ɪl d͡zy pʁẽs‿edwɑːʁ], Mi'kmaq: Epekwitk, is a Canadian province consisting of the main island itself, as well as other…

  • New Brunswick

    New Brunswick (French: Nouveau-Brunswick; pronounced: [nu.vo.bʁœn.swik], Quebec French pronunciation: [nu.vo.bʁɔn.zwɪk]) is one of Canada's three Maritime provinces and is constitutionally bilingual (English–French). It was created as a result of th…

  • University of Toronto

    The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institutio…

  • Northwest Territories

    The Northwest Territories (NWT; French: les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, TNO) is a territory of Canada. With a population of 41,462 in 2011 and an estimated population of 43,537 in 2013, the Northwest Territories is the most populous territory in Nort…

  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police

    The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP; French: Gendarmerie royale du Canada (GRC), literally 'Royal Gendarmerie of Canada'; colloquially known as the Mounties, and internally as 'the Force') is both a federal and a national police force of Canada.

  • Newfoundland (island)

    Newfoundland (/njfənˈlæn/ new-fən-LAND; French: Terre-Neuve, Mi'kmaq: Taqamkuk), is a large Canadian island off the east coast of the North American mainland, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

  • SS Edmund Fitzgerald

    The SS Edmund Fitzgerald was an American Great Lakes freighter that sank in a Lake Superior storm on November 10, 1975, with the loss of the entire crew of 29. When launched on June 8, 1958, she was the largest ship on North America's Great Lakes, a…

  • St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

    St. John's (/ˌsntˈɒnz/, local /ˌsntˈɑːnz/) is the capital and largest city in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. St. John's was incorporated as a city in 1921, yet is considered by some to be the oldest English-founded city in North America.…

  • Greater Toronto Area

    The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is a metropolitan area in Canada. At the 2011 census, it had a population of 6,054,191, and the census metropolitan area had a population of 5,583,064. The Greater Toronto Area is defined as the central city of Toronto…

  • Columbia River

    The Columbia River is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. The river rises in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. It flows northwest and then south into the US state of Washington, then turns west to form …

  • Halifax Explosion

    The Halifax Explosion occurred in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, on the morning of December 6, 1917. SS Mont-Blanc, a French cargo ship fully loaded with wartime explosives, was involved in a collision with the Norwegian vessel SS Imo in the Narrows,…

  • Gimli Glider

    The Gimli Glider is the nickname of an Air Canada aircraft that was involved in an unusual aviation incident. On July 23, 1983, Air Canada Flight 143, a Boeing 767–233 jet, ran out of fuel at an altitude of 41,000 feet (12,000 m) MSL, about halfway …

  • Saskatoon

    Saskatoon is a city in central Saskatchewan, Canada, on the South Saskatchewan River. Residents of the city of Saskatoon are called Saskatonians. The city is surrounded by the Rural Municipality of Corman Park No.

  • University of British Columbia

    The University of British Columbia, commonly referred to as UBC, is a public Canadian research university based in British Columbia. Founded in 1908 as the McGill University College of British Columbia, the University became independent and adopted …

  • Paul Bernardo

    Paul Kenneth Bernardo, also known as Paul Jason Teale (born 27 August 1964), is a Canadian serial killer and rapist, known for the highly publicized sexual assaults and murders he committed with his wife Karla Homolka and the serial rapes he committ…

  • Regina, Saskatchewan

    Regina (/rɨˈnə/ Assiniboine: huhúžubina; Cree: oskana kā-asastēki) is the capital city of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The city is the second-largest in the province and a cultural and commercial centre for southern Saskatchewan. It is…

  • River delta

    A river delta is a landform that forms at the mouth of a river, where the river flows into an ocean, sea, estuary, lake, or reservoir. Deltas form from deposition of sediment carried by a river as the flow leaves its mouth.